crochet blanket completed

150910 blanketinsun

This project was a joy to work on, and the border far more pleasant than I expected, even though I had to pull it out and substitute a second, less yarn-consuming stitch. And it was fun weighing the yarn remaining at the end of each round. So little left of the 200 g balls – 41 g total!

100910 yarnremaining

The details:

5 X 200 g balls of yarn, 8 ply (approximately 400 m of each).

4 mm crochet hook.

144 squares worked, joined together on the final round.

Motif:

make a loop (just yarn, or 4 chain ring if preferred)

rnd 1: 12 tr in loop

rnd 2: 2 tr in each space between trebles

rnd 3: *(2 tr, 3 ch, 2 tr, 1ch) in space, (2 htr, 1 ch) in next two spaces, repeat from * total 4 times

rnd 4: *(2 tr, 3 ch, 2 tr, 1ch) in 3 ch space, (2 tr, 1 ch) in 1 ch spaces, repeat from * total 4 times

** to join squares on final round, substitute sl st for a single ch – the second of 3 ch when working a corner (and insert hook into ch to fix st), the 1 ch spaces when working along the sides.

150910 blanketborder

 Border:

4 rounds identical to rnd 4 of the motif. Spaces where corners have been joined are treated as 1 ch spaces. Just work corners at corners.

Final round: *(tr, 2 ch, tr) into each 1 ch space, repeat from * for the length of the rug.

At corners: (tr, 2 ch) 3 times, then 1 tr in the 3 ch space.

(I liked this better with 3 ch between the two trebles, but realised I would have insufficient yarn for this variation. I liked the spikiness.)

150910 blanketborder2

 Original Border, which I loved, but had insufficient yarn to complete:

Final round: *(2 tr, 3 ch, 2tr, 1ch) into 1 ch space, (sl st, 1 ch) in next 1 ch space, repeat from * for the length of the rug. 

At corners: (2 tr, 3 ch,2 tr, 3 ch, 2 tr, 1 ch) into 3 ch space, (sl st, 1 ch) in next 1 ch space.

150910 awkwardcornerstogether

Where previous space holds a group of trebles, I tried to compensate the following way:

In 1 ch space before corner: (2 tr, 3 ch, 1 tr, 1 dc, 1 ch), (sl st, 1 ch) in next treble (before 3 ch space),

then (2 tr, 3 ch, 2 tr, 1ch) in 3 ch space, (sl st, 1 ch) in next treble (before 1 ch space), (1 dc, 1 tr, 3 ch, 2 tr, 1 ch) in next space for symmetry, continue as before.

Of course, if I had worked one more or one fewer border rounds before this final round, I would not have had to fiddle about at the corners. (Even number of squares, so even number of spaces along the edges. With each round, an extra space is added, so alternate rounds have an odd number of spaces, and for this sort of edging, an odd number of spaces is required, so that each end of the side will require the same stitches in its space to make the corner.) But I wanted to use all of the colours in the border, and to use up as much of the yarn as possible. I don’t mind if the corners are not identical.

150910 blanketborder3

A third border I tried, but did not like so much for this blanket, but will use in future:

sl st,*( 3 ch, 2 tr in next 1 ch space, 3 ch, sl st in next 1 ch space), repeat from *. 

Like the abandoned border, strange things would need to happen at corners where the number of spaces along the side of the blanket is even, and I am not sure what I would do at the corners, maybe some variation on the corners I worked on this blanket.

I don’t know if any of these final rounds have been printed anywhere. I found myself thinking of Elizabeth Zimmermann and her ‘unventing’ of knitting techniques. It seems unlikely that nobody would have done this previously (particularly the ‘V-stitch’ variation I ended up using). I was just too lazy to go hunting about for border patterns, and I did not want to risk using much more yarn than on a conventional round, as for the other colours, only 8 g of yarn remained (from around 32 g at the start of the border). And then I can think of how while no part of the rug is unique, others have used this yarn, others have crocheted this pattern, the final product is unique. 

150910 blanketsection
 
 
Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s